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Hi.

Welcome to my blog. Pull up a chair, find your next read and let’s chat about it!

Q&A with Kyle Prue, The Flames

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Do you believe certain types of writing translate better into audiobook format?

Lots of dialogue is always better for audiobooks. Although, in my opinion dialogue is better for everything.

Was a possible audiobook recording something you were conscious of while writing?

Not with the first book, however with the Flames I was sure to begin and end the chapters with interesting bits of language to give Preston something to work with. That’s what keeps the listener chomping at the bit for more.

How did you select your narrator?

We held auditions through ACX.  We were paying for performance rather than based on royalties so we had a lot of great narrators audition. They all seemed equally talented until we received Preston’s audition. Then we all said, “This is the guy!”  His voices are phenomenal and really let you picture what the movie would be like.

Is there a particular part of this story that you feel is more resonating in the audiobook performance than in the book format?

Whenever I get to listen to the monologues I’m alway impressed by how they come to life when spoken aloud.

What do you say to those who view listening to audiobooks as “cheating” or as inferior to “real reading”?

I don’t think it’s cheating but I do think it is very different. It’s a good idea to do both. Audiobooks are very convenient and have their place. I mean, it’s not like I can very well read on the highway. Law Enforcement frowns upon that sort of thing.

How did you celebrate after finishing this novel?

It takes me roughly two months of daily strenuous writing to finish a book. So once a book is finally done I’ll usually take a week to get back on a healthy sleep schedule. Then it’s time to edit.

In your opinion, what are the pros and cons of writing a stand-alone novel vs. writing a series?

When you write a stand alone novel you don’t have to listen to a fanbase. Your book comes out and it’s done. When you write a series you have to listen to people beg you for the next book or demand you answer their fan theories. I’m not complaining though. Most of the fan theories are better than what I come up with.

What bits of advice would you give to aspiring authors?

You must read. As Stephen King says, “If you don’t have time to read, then you don’t have the time or tools to write.”

 

Q&A with Meredith Potts, The Daley Buzz Cozy Mysteries

Q&A with Leslie Kelly, Watching You