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Review: The Jefferson Key by Steve Berry

Summary
When an assassination attempt was made on President Daniels, former government operative Cotton Malone was called in to solve this case of who is behind this who done it. Unfortunately, this particular case was not your typical. It is connected to a dangerous secret society of pirates known as the Commonwealth who because of a clause in the Constitution can protect them from the law despite what they do. 

There is one problem. This part written is missing from the original pages that would make them untouchable. Tired of the government coming after them, they are willing to kill to protect themselves and get to the pages before anyone else can. How it can be found is by deciphering a code which will lead them to where they are located. 

In their most dangerous case, Malone and Cassiopeia Vitt risk their lives to unravel this plot and in the process almost lose their lives to stop them from doing anymore harm.

Review
I thought the overall story was very intriguing. He did such a great job with mixing the historical facts and creative fiction into such a compelling read. Once you get into it, it really grabs your interest. Not only the who done it but all things that happened that led up to end. The different turns in the plot make this book very fascinating. 

I think the best part of the book was that whole storyline with the pirate culture. It wasn’t your typical Hollywood stereotype. He gave it depth and you get a whole different opinion of them compared to what your accustomed to in the movies. If you like action, this definitely was filled with a lot of scenes that came alive and for that aspect you will not be disappointed. So, if you are up for a thrilling adventure, it’s not a short read, but it was a good one.

Reviewed by Michelle Bowles

Book Information
Publisher: Random House
Release Date: 5/17/11
Pages: 480

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