Review: Soulless (The Immortal Gene #1) by Jacinta Maree

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About the Book

Welcome to Soulless.
We are the generation that laughs at death.

Reincarnation; what was once considered a gift of immortality has become an eternity of nightmares.

Nadia Richards lives in a world plagued by reincarnation, a system of recycling souls where all past memories, personalities and traumatic events are relived daily in disjointed sequences. Trapped within their own warped realities, not even the richest and most powerful are saved from their own minds unraveling. Madness is the new human nature, and civilizations are crumpling beneath themselves trying to outrun it. 

Within a society that ignores death, Nadia appears to be the one exception to the reincarnation trap. Born without any reincarnated memories and with printless eyes, the hot tempered 19 year old quickly becomes the ultimate prize to all those wishing to end the vicious cycle, or for some, to ensure they could evade death forever.

Readers discretion: Adult language, violence and some adult scenes. For mature audiences only.

Review

Sci-fi is and will always be one of my favorite genres. I'm always looking to branch out and read contemporary works and old classics, there's so much to explore and imagine in this genre, and Soulless brings an intriguing philosophical/moral aspect that makes it a stand out among contemporary sci-fi.

This novel fits solidly inside a dystopian sci-do subgenre and is, in fact, very glum. The world is rotted away and turned into a horrible classist hell. It gave me Neuromancer vibes throughout, which is definitely a compliment. The story follows Nadia, a twenty year old with no past lives in a world dominated by brutal reincarnation.

This is a great premise for a novel and one that got me to read it in the first place. Exploring human lives changing in a culture because of soul recycling makes for a very bleak future. If you kill people in one life, your soul is blacklisted forever and you are imprisoned. Sounds a like a moral dilemma to me, Minority Report anyone?

Nadia unfortunately is suddenly the subject of interest by one of the Elite doctors that wants to use her body to find a cure for remembering past lives-- basically he wants to revert humanity back to the ol' ways (i.e.: now). Nadia, on the other hand, does not want to die (which is fair) and escapes with a guy who may be the most desensitized person on the planet. Their dynamic is entertaining, to say the least.

Overall, I think the concept behind the novel drives readers forward in an honest way and makes for a very fast, chilling read. Nadia doesn't come across as the normal "strong female protagonist" trope, which is getting to get tired anyway. She just seems like the most human in a world of non-humans, which makes for an interesting idea to riddle over.

If you like a quick a sci-fi read with some moral and philosophical dilemmas mixed in, pick this puppy up, you won't be disappointed.